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Re: government eavesdropping

  • From: Henry R. Linneweh
  • Date: Thu Feb 24 18:49:51 2000

Well in a worse case scenario passing around encryption software
is as easy as warez is for the software pirates so no government
will ever stop peoples privacy as long as their outlaws that will
stand up to tyrants.

It is the case of history that the oppressed rise up against the masters
that is why our country now wants to disarm the nation before the
criminals in the halls of Congress see A Second American Revolution
for the Usurpation of the ConStitution of These United States.


"Roeland M.J. Meyer" wrote:

> Duh. The various spook services and police agencies have ALWAYS had a
> tendency to "listen in". The problem is, most folks don't care. However,
> isn't this why you've killed telnetd, and most of inet.conf; forwarding all
> ports through SSH and firewalling the rest? Every packet on the network
> should be encrypted, even internal ones. This will devalue nonsense, like
> CALEA, to the level it deserves. Wire-tap won't do 'em much good when there
> is military-grade encryption on the line <grin>.
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: owner-nanog@merit.edu [mailto:owner-nanog@merit.edu]On Behalf Of
> > Jeff Ogden
> > Sent: Thursday, February 24, 2000 5:21 AM
> >
> > So what is the real story here?  Is all, most, some of our
> > international Internet traffic being intercepted by various
> > governments?  Is it only international traffic that is at issue or is
> > domestic traffic within the US subject to routine eavesdropping
> > without a court order?
> >
> > For years I've been telling people that while there was some risk
> > that traffic on the Internet could be intercepted, that the risk was
> > greatest at the ends of a connection and that as long as they were
> > working with a reputable ISP that there was almost no risk that
> > anyone was eavesdropping on the traffic from the more central
> > networks.  I've also been telling people that data "at rest" on disks
> > or stored in servers is much more at risk than data "in motion" as it
> > moves across the Internet. Have I been misleading people?
> >
> >     -Jeff Ogden
> >      Merit
> >
> > >From http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20000223/wl/eu_espionage_1.html
> > >
> > >Wednesday February 23 9:50 AM ET
> > >
> > >Report Details Vast Spy Network
> > >
> > >By CONSTANT BRAND Associated Press Writer
> > >
> > >BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - A U.S.-led communications
> > >monitoring network is intercepting ``billions of messages per
> > >hour'' including telephone calls, fax transmissions and private
> > >e-mails, according to a European Parliament report made public
> > >Wednesday.
> > >
> > >``We are not talking about a trivial thing here ... we cannot stop
> > >them, they will continue,'' said Ducan Campbell, author of the
> > >special parliament-commissioned report on the Echelon
> > >spy-network.
> > >
> > >Campbell said that the intelligence network monitors and
> > >intercepts sensitive European-wide commercial communications.
> > >``The level of use is getting out of control,'' he told a packed
> > >hearing of the Parliament's Committee for Justice and Home
> > >Affairs.
> > >
> > >He said Canada, Britain, Australia and New Zealand are also
> > >involved in Echelon. Other nations including France and Germany
> > >also participate in a lower level in the spy-network which dates
> > >back 50 years to the beginning of the Cold War.
> > >
> > >``The capacity of the filtering systems is enormous,'' Campbell
> > >said. He added that most international internet communications
> > >are being routed through the United States and through nine known
> > >U.S. National Security Agency interception sites.
> > >
> > >Intelligence facilities located in the five countries can intercept fax,
> > >e-mail or telephone communications easily he said. Campbell
> > >urged the European Union to take action to protect against
> > >unwanted interception of communications, which he said were
> > >violations of human rights.
> > >
> > >Committee chairman Graham Watson said he wanted to be sure
> > >the international surveillance system was not abusing its powers.
> > >
> > >Campbell said Microsoft, IBM, and a certain ``large American
> > >microchip maker'' were providing certain product features which
> > >allow the interception of information flow.
> > >
> > >Campbell said he did not know whether the U.S. corporations were
> > >benefitting from the information gathering but said previous
> > >commercial espionage resulted in the collapse of several European
> > >contracts in the airline industry - both military and commercial.
> >
> >

--
Thank you;
|--------------------------------------------|
| Thinking is a learned process so is UNIX   |
|--------------------------------------------|
Henry R. Linneweh







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