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Re: OT: Yahoo- apparently now an extension of the Chinese govt secret police....

  • From: Joseph S D Yao
  • Date: Wed Sep 07 16:26:14 2005

On Wed, Sep 07, 2005 at 04:05:48PM -0400, Patrick W. Gilmore wrote:
> On Sep 7, 2005, at 3:59 PM, Rich Kulawiec wrote:
> >On Wed, Sep 07, 2005 at 03:10:12PM +0100,  
> >Michael.Dillon@btradianz.com wrote:
> >
> >>Every company has to obey the laws of the jurisdictions
> >>in which they do business, and for international
> >>companies, that list of jurisdictions can be very,
> >>very long.
> >
> >Obeying the (local) law is, in most cases, very reasonable.
> >
> >But when presented with *that* request from *that* government, the  
> >correct
> >response -- from anyone with a conscience and a spine -- is "go to  
> >hell".
> 
> Not in *that* country, it's not.  You knew the rules before you  
> crossed the border.  If you are there, you have to follow the rules.
> 
> There is an argument to be made for not being in "that country" to  
> begin with, but if you are there, you better comply.


So, let's do the logic, as this is a simple schoolchild exercise.

If one has a conscience and a spine, then one says no to this kind of
request.

If one is in mainland China to do business, one is compelled not to say
no to this kind of request.

>From the first statement, if one does not to say no to this kind of
request, then one does not have a conscience or a spine.

Let us take as given that if one is compelled to do something, that is
to say that one is doing it, as that is the meaning of compel.

Therefore, if one is in mainland China to do business, then one does not
have a conscience or a spine.

As I said, this is simple schoolchild logic, the kind we all supposedly
learned in school.  One may argue with the premises, but if one accepts
the premises, one may not argue with the conclusion.


-- 
Joe Yao
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