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Re: DC power versus AC power

  • From: Scott Granados
  • Date: Sun Dec 29 20:41:39 2002


>
> Unnamed Administration sources reported that Scott Granados said:
> >
> > Is 48V DC at the amps present normallyin switch rooms etc enough to
cause
> > electricucian?  I have seen bad things with wrenches dropped across
> > batteries even 12 volt car batteries although in this case it was a
large
> > battery bank in a submarine but I was curious about the 48V sources in
> > switch rooms.
>
>
> Electrocution is but one way to die from too many columbs.
> Internal burning is a big one.  Most people die, not from immediate
> cardiac arrest, but rather from kidney/spleen/liver failure as
> they try to remove the cooked you parts from your bloodstream,
> and clog up. (First responder treatment is multiple saline inputs
> to flush you out, and keep flushing you. This via a friend who was
> "lit" and lived.)
>

The only way I've seen anyone die from being shocked is heart failure.  This
was a very very large AC hit though not DC.


> The instantaneous short circuit current available from a CO-grade
> battery string is nothing short of frightening. It will easily
> turn a 18" crescent wrench bright orange and start spitting the
> molten metal around within few seconds.
>
> I'm surprised you're still around after a sub battery accident.
> They're a grade up from most CO's in available current, I'd bet.
>

Yes, they are I don't recall the amps off hand but it was amazing.  It does
take a lot of juice though to spin motors that large and run all that
equipment considering your primary power source is nuclear also.

In my case I wasn't the one who was hit I was a fair distance off and
someone working, an electrician, touched a wrench across the terminals on
one cell only.  For get a few seconds pretty instantly the wrench was gone
as well as a better part of his hand and wrist.  However, touching both
terminals on the cell did not yield a shock which was what made me think and
ask the question i the first place.  I can't imagine the damage possible
though if someone in that setting touched one of the main bus's.

>
>
>
> --
> A host is a host from coast to coast.................wb8foz@nrk.com
> & no one will talk to a host that's close........[v].(301) 56-LINUX
> Unless the host (that isn't close).........................pob 1433
> is busy, hung or dead....................................20915-1433
>





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